parenting

Teens are growing up more slowly today than they did in past decades
Teens are growing up more slowly today than they did in past decades (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

Many people believe that teenagers today grow up faster than they used to, while others argue that today’s youth are growing up more slowly, perhaps due to overprotection by their parents. A new study explored this issue by examining how ... Read More »

Parental lack of confidence in GPs contributing to overcrowding in emergency departments
Parental lack of confidence in GPs contributing to overcrowding in emergency departments (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

Australia’s first national survey of parent confidence in GPs found fewer than half of parents were completely confident in a GP to handle most of their child’s general health issues. Lead researcher, University of Melbourne Professor Gary Freed, said parents’ diminishing confidence ... Read More »

First-time mothers more uncertain about vaccines than mothers with children
First-time mothers more uncertain about vaccines than mothers with children (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

First-time mums are more hesitant and undecided about childhood vaccinations compared to mothers with children and only two thirds of all mothers believe they receive enough information on vaccines during pregnancy. In a new study published in Vaccine by researchers ... Read More »

Mothers’ responses to their babies’ distress help predict infant attachment
Mothers’ responses to their babies’ distress help predict infant attachment (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

The security of the relationship infants establish with their mothers is important for children’s development. Although most babies establish secure attachment relationships with their mothers, approximately 40% of infants establish insecure attachment relationships, with some developing insecure-avoidant attachments (minimising expressing ... Read More »

Physical punishment can be detrimental for children’s behaviour ten years later
Physical punishment can be detrimental for children’s behaviour ten years later (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

Past research has indicated that physical punishment, such as spanking, has negative consequences on child development. However, most research studies have examined short-term associations—less than one year—between discipline and development. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri have found that ... Read More »

Country kids face veg challenges
Country kids face veg challenges (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

Regional and remote kids face unique challenges when it comes to eating the recommended amount of vegetables, new research has found. An Edith Cowan University-led study has found that children in regional and remote Western Australia need a major boost of vegetables ... Read More »

Baby sleep routines and SIDS
Baby sleep routines and SIDS (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

A USC research team is conducting one of the largest studies ever into sudden and unexpected infant deaths in Queensland. The researchers are sending surveys across the state to families with babies born during April and May this year asking ... Read More »

How Infant Directed Speech shapes your child’s development
How Infant Directed Speech shapes your child’s development (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

The way you speak to your baby can tell a very specific story. Through the subconscious mechanism of babytalk, a parent’s voice can offer encouragement, discipline or comfort, and according to new research findings, it can even facilitate early language ... Read More »

Antibiotic overload a concern for Aussie kids
Antibiotic overload a concern for Aussie kids (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

A new study has found that half of Australian infants are treated with antibiotics during their first year of life – one of the highest rates in the world. In a time of rising antimicrobial resistance and growing evidence of ... Read More »

Supersizing vegetables could be key to kids’ consumption
Supersizing vegetables could be key to kids’ consumption (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

In a first-of-its-kind randomised controlled trial, researchers from Deakin’s Centre for Advanced Sensory Science found that children ate more carrot when given them whole, as opposed to a serving of the diced vegetable. The study – recently published in the ... Read More »

 
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