food allergies

Treatment for multiple food allergies
Treatment for multiple food allergies (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

In a randomized, controlled phase-2 clinical trial, an asthma medication increased the speed and safety of a protocol used to treat children for several food allergies at once, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of ... Read More »

Adolescents with food allergies experience frequent anaphylactic episodes
Adolescents with food allergies experience frequent anaphylactic episodes (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

A new study by researchers from the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute (MCRI) has shown that 40% of Australian adolescents with food allergies are experiencing frequent allergic reactions, including anaphylaxis. Senior author Professor Katie Allen said that previous research has shown ... Read More »

A cure may be possible for peanut allergy
A cure may be possible for peanut allergy (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

A treatment for deadly peanut allergy undergoing clinical trials at the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute (MCRI) has shown long-lasting effects, more than four years after the original study. It provides the strongest evidence yet that a cure may be possible ... Read More »

Link between food allergies and childhood anxiety
Link between food allergies and childhood anxiety (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

Researchers at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health and Albert Einstein College of Medicine studied the link between food allergy and childhood anxiety and depression among a sample of predominantly low socioeconomic status minority children. The results showed that ... Read More »

Children growing out of some food allergies but Australian allergy levels still sky-high
Children growing out of some food allergies but Australian allergy levels still sky-high (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

The number of Australian children who outgrow egg allergy has contributed to a drop in food allergies between the ages of one and four years of age, new research by the Australian Centre of Food and Allergy Research based at ... Read More »

Oral Immunotherapy Is Safe, Effective Treatment for Peanut-Allergic Preschoolers
Oral Immunotherapy Is Safe, Effective Treatment for Peanut-Allergic Preschoolers (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)

Nearly 80% of peanut-allergic preschool children successfully incorporated peanut-containing foods into their diets after receiving peanut oral immunotherapy (OIT), a clinical trial has found. Peanut OIT involves eating small, gradually increasing amounts of peanut protein daily. Low-dose and high-dose OIT were safe ... Read More »

Teenagers with asthma at increased risk of life-threatening anaphylaxis
Teenagers with asthma at increased risk of life-threatening anaphylaxis (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)

Teenagers with food allergy are four times more likely to report having asthma than those without food allergy. People with multiple food allergies report 10 times the incidence. According to Professor Katie Allen, the concern is that for these teens, ... Read More »

Great result for Infant Feeding Guidelines consensus
Great result for Infant Feeding Guidelines consensus (2 votes, average: 4.00 out of 5)

The Centre for Food & Allergy Research (CFAR) Australian Infant Feeding Guidelines Summit was hosted by Murdoch Childrens Research Institute (MCRI) on Friday 13th May 2016. The Australasian Society for Clinical Immunology and Allergy (ASCIA) Guidelines provide advice and recommendations relevant ... Read More »

Infant milk formula does not reduce risk of eczema and allergies
Infant milk formula does not reduce risk of eczema and allergies (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)

A type of baby formula does not reduce allergy risk – despite previous claims to the contrary – according to research led by Imperial College London. The study, published in The BMJ, reviewed data from 37 different trials into hydrolysed ... Read More »

Migration clue to nut allergy
Migration clue to nut allergy (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)

Australian-born children with Asian mothers have higher rates of nut allergy than Asian-born children who migrate to Australia, new research has found. It suggests the Asian environment is protective against food allergy but Australian-born Asian children, possibly because they have ... Read More »

 
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