7 weeks pregnant

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7 weeks pregnant

Week 7 of pregnancy the fifth week of your baby’s development and the second week of the period in which all your baby’s organs start developing. This period is called the embryogenesis stage of pregnancy; it begins in week 6 of pregnancy and continues until the end of week 10. You should be ‘feeling pregnant’ by now and, if you’re experiencing morning sickness, you’re not alone- most women experience this unpleasant (but normal) symptom of pregnancy in the first trimester.

Baby is developing rapidly as its internal organs continue to grow and take shape (including the brain, heart, lungs and digestive organs). Your baby also begins to look more and more like a little human, as the buds which will form arms and legs lengthen and facial features become more prominent. You’ve probably already consulted your doctor or pregnancy healthcare provider, but if you haven’t, now is a good time for an appointment, to check your pregnancy is developing normally and discuss any concerns you may have.

56460615 Woman laughingAt 7 weeks pregnant you’re almost certainly experiencing early pregnancy symptoms like morning sickness, fatigue and tender breasts. You may also be feeling a little emotional as your pregnancy hormones kick in and have you crying at the drop of a hat.

Find out more about the changes in week seven of pregnancy.

 

147008539 Happy coupleEmbryo development begins when you are 6 weeks pregnant and continues rapidly this week. Your baby begins to look more like a human as its head, arms and legs grow. The seventh week of pregnancy is also a time when the internal organs develop rapidly. This week baby’s brain enlarges, kidneys and lungs start to form and organs of the gastrointestinal and urogenital systems begin to develop.

Find out more about how your baby changes in the seventh week of pregnancy.

114274104 Woman at doctor'sIf pregnancy symptoms like morning sickness, body changes or emotions are bothering you this week, rest assured that they’re probably normal, but talk to your doctor if you need reassurance. However, if you experience early pregnancy spotting (spot bleeding), you may be at risk of miscarriage and should see your doctor.

Find out more about staying healthy in pregnancy week 7.

154021786 Couple using tabletWeek 7 of pregnancy is a time of rapid embryo development when it’s common for women to experience pregnancy symptoms like morning sickness and breast discomfort. It’s important to visit your doctor for a pregnancy check-up if you have not already done so.

Find out about other key changes which occur in the seventh week of pregnancy.

References

  1. Moore KL, Persaud TVN, Torchia MG. The Developing Human: Clinically oriented embryology (9th edition). Philadelphia: Saunders-Elselvier; 2011. (Book)
  2. Mayo Clinic. Guide to a healthy Pregnancy. Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. 2011. Pp 17-32, 83-94. (Book)
  3. Women’s and Children’s Health Service- Government of South Australia. Pregnancy- Emotional health- your worries and feelings. 2011. [cited 3 November 2012]. Available from: URL Link
  4. Beyond Blue. Emotional Health During Pregnancy and Early Parenthood. 2010. [cited 3 November 2012]. Available from: URL Link
  5. Beyond Blue. Clinical Practice Guidelines- Depression and related disorders- anxiety, bipolar disorder and puerperal psychosis- in the perinatal period. A guideline for primary care professionals. 2011. (cited 20 December 2012). Available from: URL Link
  6. Beyond Baby Blues. The beyond baby blues guide to emotional health and wellbeing in pregnancy and early parent hood. 2012. (cited 21 December 2012). Available from: URL Link
  7. US Department of Health and Human Services Office on Women’s Health. Pregnancy- Body Changes and Discomforts. 2010. (cited 6 January 2013). Available from: URL Link
Date Created: January 3, 2011 Date Modified: March 21, 2013

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