- Advertisement -
Home Blog Page 185

Fine motor skills

 

What are motor skills?

Motor skills are movement abilities, that is, the ability to move the body and its parts in different ways for different purposes. As children develop, their movement abilities become increasingly complex, allowing them to perform a wider range of movements and tasks. The body’s gross motor system controls the large movements of the arms, legs and torso which depend on the development of gross motor skills. The fine motor system controls the fine movements of the extremities, including the fingers and toes.

What are fine motor skills?

Fine motor skills are the ability to coordinate the use of these small muscles to manipulate the fingers, hands and arms, and coordinate their movements with what the eye sees (often referred to as hand-eye coordination). Using the small muscles of the hands and fingers allows children to control tools and objects with their hands.

The small muscles of the fine motor system work in conjunction with the large muscles of the gross motor system. The large muscles provide the movement and stability necessary for the performance of many fine movements. For example, the torso and shoulder stabilise the arm while a child moves their hand and/or fingers while writing.

How our motor skills develop

Baby foodFine motor and gross motor skills typically develop in a sequenced manner, from the midline of the body outwards. Gross motor abilities are related to the movement of muscles in the centre of the body (sometimes referred to as the proximal muscles) and so begin to develop earlier than fine motor skills. Early gross motor skills allow babies to do things like move around on their belly, crawl and walk.

The fine motor system is comprised of the muscles which control the limbs, hands and feet (sometimes called distal muscles). children_playing_marbles_300x400 Motor skills also develop from the head downwards to the toes, meaning that babies learn to use their hands and fingers before they learn to use their feet and toes. The larger muscles of the fine motor system typically develop prior to the small ones, for example a baby will learn to make coordinated movements involving the entire hand and wrist (reaching out to grab something), before they begin moving their fingers in a coordinated manner (e.g. to pick something up). They begin holding objects using their palm (palmar grasps) before they learn to grasp thing with just their fingers (pincer grasps).

What do children use fine motor skills for?

Fine motor skills enable effective use of the hand and children rely on fine motors skills to care for themselves, to perform tasks at school and day to day chores like cooking and washing the car. Anything children do with their hands relies on the fine motor muscles and skills. At school children spend up to 60% of their day performing tasks that involve the use off their fine motor skills.

Writing and drawing

Fine motor skills allow children to write, draw and read (because they allow children to turn the pages of books), important skills child_hand_holding_pencil_Writing_300x350without which children will struggle to achieve at school. Until they have developed their fine motors skills, children will find it difficult to learn in other educational areas like mathematics, because this type of learning also requires them to be able to write. Children must develop the ability to write easily using tripod grasp, without concentrating on how to form the letters, so that they can free up their minds to focus on the content of what they are writing (e.g. to think about the maths equation they are writing down, rather than how to write the numbers and symbols).

Children who struggle to use the small muscles in their fingers may be reluctant to engage in tasks like cutting or writing, because they get frustrated, tired or fear failure. The content of a child’s work suffers when they have difficulty writing, and improving writing ability can improve content. For example, increasing writing speed helped children keep up with the volume of written work at school and improving legibility helps others focus on the content of writing (rather than what it looks like).

Some important writing and drawing abilities children should develop as they age include:

  • Holding a range of writing implements, including pencils, pens and crayons with the correct grasp (dynamic tripod grasp).
  • Writing neatly and legibly, in letter of a consistent size.
  • Stabilising paper with one hand as they write with another.
  • Turning the pages of books.
  • Using a range of instruments including compasses and protractors to draw shapes and symbols, manipulating the drawing instrument with one hand and the writing instrument with the other.

For more information: developing writing and drawing skills.

Manipulating objects

Manipulating objects with the hands and fingers is something adults do unconsciously. However children need to learn skills such as how to pick things up using only their fingers, how to use their palm to cup water or small objects like coins and how to hold their hand steady while they move their fingers independently. Manipulating objects like blocks for construction or beads for threading can be lots of fun. But manipulating objects is also fundamental for a healthy life- it allows children to do things like lift a spoon to one’s mouth to feed or brush their hair.

The types of objects a child can manipulate, and the ways in which they manipulate them vary depending on age and fine motor Child Magiciandevelopment. For example, babies can reach out and grab, and usually hold onto large objects with their entire fist for a short period of time. As motor skills increase, children develop the ability to pick up smaller objects using only their fingers. They develop the ability to use their hands and fingers independently of each other, for example to hold something in the palm of their hand while using their fingers to manipulate another object.

Children may use their ability to manipulate objects for:

  • Threading beads.
  • Cutting and pasting pictures to make a collage.
  • Painting using a brush or their fingers.
  • Folding, tearing and crumpling paper.
  • Constructing from blocks, cardboard or other materials.
  • Banging with a hammer.
  • Playing musical instruments.
  • Putting on costumes with buttons, zippers and bows for dramatic play.

Self care tasks and feeding

Children also rely on their fine motor skills to help themselves, for example to do up the buttons on their clothes, tie their shoelaces, pick up things that they drop, washing and going to the toilet.

  • Tying bows and knots, for example their shoe laces.
  • Fastening buttons and zips;
  • Opening lunch containers and drink bottles;
  • Washing their hands, combing their hair and brushing their teeth.
  • Holding onto a piece of food and raising it to their mouth.
  • Manipulating utensils like spoons, forks and knives.
  • Pouring drinks from a container or jug to a glass.

When do children develop fine motor skills?

Fine motor skills develop throughout life. While children rapidly increase their ability to manipulate objects with their hands in early childhood, they will continue to refine and improve fine motor skills throughout adolescence and into adulthood.

All children develop at different rates and show different strengths and abilities. Children who love writing, colouring and drawing are likely to develop their fine motor skills more quickly than children who can’t sit still. Choosing activities that are appropriate for your child, for example those that they enjoy and those that will help them develop skills they struggle a bit more with, will help children develop.

Parents may wonder what to expect of their child at a certain age and when to seek professional advice if their child seems to be lagging far behind. Although all children develop different skills at different ages, there are patterns in child development, and most children are able to do certain things in a certain order.For example, children will be able to make marks on a piece of paper before they can draw circles, lines or letters.

Fundamental abilities such as the ability to fasten a button or write one’s name are often referred to as development milestones. Parents can get a sense of how their child’s development compares to other children’s (and if their child’s development may be delayed and need intervention) by comparing their abilities to the abilities of most other children of their age. For more information: development milestones for children.

When assessing development milestones, don’t panic if your child doesn’t quite stack up against where other children are at. No two children are the same and their fine motor and all other skills will develop differently to all other children.

How do children develop fine motor skills?

Children develop fine motor skills by engaging in tasks that require them to use their fingers. This includes tasks like writing, drawing and colouring in, picking things up (especially small things), turning pages, cutting, pasting and folding, moulding playdough or doing up their own buttons. Now that computers are commonly found in schools and homes, children may miss some of the opportunities they previously had to develop their fine motor skills because they spend less time playing with objects they need to touch and manipulate. Computers and other electronic devices like touch screens also require the use of fine motor skills, but turns on these devices should be limited to 15 minutes.

How to help children develop fine motor skills

You can help your child develop their fine motor skills by providing them with opportunities to use their fingers in fun ways. If your child likes writing, drawing and other arty activities, they’ll have plenty of fun developing their fine motor skills through these activities. However, if your child is one of those that prefers running around outside, there are plenty of other ways to develop fine motor skills which they might find more enjoyable, for example picking up small stones on the ground or writing on the footpath with chalk. The more children enjoy the activities that develop their fine motor skills, the easier it will be for them to master these skills. So try to provide opportunities which fit well with your child’s interests and likes.

Why is developing fine motor skills important for children?

Developing fine motor skills in early childhood is important because it provides children with the foundation they need to succeed in education and to become independent with self-care tasks.

Fundamental fine motor movements and grasps

Fine motor movements can be categorised as those that enable children to (1) grasp, (2) reach and (3) release. Different parts of the hand, for example the fingers and the palm, are used to perform different movements. These hand movements and grasps rely on children developing:

  • Hand strength.
  • Hand side separation: holding an object in pincer grip while stabilising the hand with the middle and ring fingers.Child soaping hands
  • Flexibility: being able to bend and flex different parts of the hand including the fingers. For example their hands need to be flexible enough for palmer arching and to create web space (space between the thumb and forefinger when they are joined) .
  • Dexterity: the precise and coordinated movements of the hands and fingers.
  • Coordination: synchronising the movement of the hands and fingers. It may also be referred to as visual motor integration.

Motor skills also involve a cognitive component, that is, the ability to think through and plan what they want to do with their hands. Children who are unable to think through and plan the use of their motor functions may find new play situations (e.g. with a new toy) challenging and appear clumsy when engaged in play. Similarly those that have poor visual perception (e.g. who are unable to recognise letters) will not be able to coordinate the use of their hands, even if their fingers muscles are capable.

Hand and finger movements which allow children to write and manipulate objects include:

  • Intrinsic movements: which allow them to manipulate objects already in their hands with their fingers.
  • Extrinsic movements: which allow them to displace object by moving them into or out of their hands.
  • Synergistic movements: which involve the thumb and finger/s working in synergy. When the thumb and finger are perform similar movements (e.g. when they are brought together to squeeze a ball) these movements are referred to as simple synergies. When the thumb and finger engage in dissimilar actions (e.g. are moved in different directions to roll a pencil back and forward) they are referred to as reciprocal synergies.
  • Sequential pattern movements: which involve the sequenced movement of the thumb and finger/s to accomplish a task such as tying a bow or unscrewing something.
  • Palmar arching: the ability to cup their hands.

Various grasps which children develop as they grow up include:

  • Pincer grip: holding or picking up objects using only the thumb and forefinger.
  • Tripod grasp: the grasp used to grip a pencil correctly. It involves gripping the pencil between the thumb and forefinger while stabilising it on the middle finger and with the side of the hand.

References

  1. Wagenfield An Overview of Early Development. Foundations of Peadiatric Practice for the Occupational Therapy Assistant. Slack Incorporated. 2005. (URL Link)
  2. Owens Supporting children’s development- fine motor skills. Putting Children First. Issue 28. 2008. National Childcare Accreditation Council. (Full Text)
  3. Department for Education and Child Development- Government of South Australia. Fine Motor Skills Handwriting. 2004. (cited 12 May 2014). Available from: (URL Link)
  4. Mulligan S, Occupational Therapy Evaluation for Children. Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins. 2003. (URL Link)
  5. D. Windsor, M. Cermack S. Handwriting Readiness: Locatives and Visuomotor Skills in the Kindergarten Year. Early Childhood Research and Practice. 2001; 3(1). (cited 20 February 2015) Available from: (URL Link)
  6. Feder, K. Majnemer, A. Handwriting development, competency and intervention. Developmental medicine and child neurology. 2007;49(4):312-317. (cited 20 February 2015) Available from: (URL Link)
  7. Australian Curriculum and Reporting Authority. Australian Curriculum- English. Undated. (cited 12 May 2014) Available from: (URL Link)
  8. South Carolina Education Office of Early Childhood Education. Good Start Grow Smart- South Carolina Early Learning Standards for 3, 4 and 5 year old children. 2007. (cited 20 February 2015) Available From: (URL Link)
  9. Virginia Early Childhood Development Alignment Program. Milestones of child development- A guide to young children’s learning and development from birth to kindergarten. 2009. (cited 12 May 2014). Available from: (URL Link)
  10. Queensland Health. Child Development Milestones 6-8 years. 2006. (cited 5 May 2014). Available from: (URL Link)
  11. Calder Help your preschool child develop fine motor skills. 2006. (cited 12 May 2014). Available from: (URL Link)
  12. Community Childcare Cooperative Ltd (NSW). Development Milestones and the Early Years Learning Framework and the National Quality Standards. Australian Government Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations. 2012. (cited 5 May 2014). Available from: (URL Link)
  13. Flinders What are Fine Motor Skills? Undated. (Cited 12 may 2014). Available from: (URL Link)
  14. Andrews General Categories of Fine Motor Development. Michigan State University Extension. UNDATED. (cited 28 March 2014). Available from: (URL Link)
  15. Queensland Government. Supporting your child’s writing development. 2007. (cited 12 May 2014). Available from: (URL Link)
  16. Callender, SA. Gross and fine motor activities for early childhood: Preschool children (2nd ed.). Mississippi State, MS: Mississippi State University Early Childhood Institute. 2008 (cited 26 August 2014). Available from: (URL Link)
  17. Columbia University. Developmental Progression of the Grasp. UNDATED. (cited 20 February 2015). Available from: (URL Link)
  18. Eastern Kentucky University- Occupational Therapy. Writing Grasps. 2011. (cited 20 February 2015). Available from: (URL Link)

Three ways to prevent sudden heart death in fit, young athletes

Fifteen year-old Marshall Hastings is living proof of the value of having life-saving cardiac defibrillators and trained personnel at sporting events.

On a warm spring evening in 2009, he was leading a 50m race at a zone swimming carnival in suburban Sydney when he suddenly stopped and sank to the pool’s bottom.

Leaping from her seat, Marshall’s mother, Annmaree Hastings, sprinted to the poolside as she called to startled onlookers to drag her son’s inert body from the pool.

“Call it a mother’s instinct, but right away I knew something awful had happened to Marshall,” says Annmaree, recalling the event.

By the time her nine year-old son was hoisted to the pool deck he was lifeless – he had no detectable pulse, and had stopped breathing.

Fortunately, the Botany Aquatic Centre hosting the carnival had a defibrillator on hand – a device that can diagnoses life-threatening cardiac arrhythmia and deliver a shock enabling the heart to re-establish its normal rhythm.

Better still, the centre had trained staff capable of using a defibrillator and administering cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

A print-out from the defibrillator later showed Marshall’s heart hadn’t stopped, but was racing at more than 300 beats per minute – so fast, it couldn’t be detected manually.

Marshall’s heart stopped and started several times that night as pool staff, ambulance paramedics, and then emergency physicians and cardiologists at Sydney Children’s Hospital fought to save his life.

Today, Marshall and Annmaree are patients of Professor Chris Semsarian, a cardiologist whose research at the University of Sydney is revealing the secrets of inherited heart disorders and sudden death.

Both Marshall and his mum have an inherited gene mutation, known to cause CPVT. It causes the heart to be electrically unstable under stress conditions, and prone to developing an abnormally rapid rhythm called ventricular tachycardia.

“People with CPVT can develop a dangerous heart arrhythmia initiated by the release of adrenaline during physical exertion,” says Chris Semsarian.

“This dangerous arrhythmia triggers a heartbeat before the ventricles have fully recovered from the previous beat. When this occurs, the heart muscle begins to quiver, and can’t contract effectively.

“If it doesn’t self-correct, blood may not be effectively pumped around the body, which can lead to dizziness and rapid loss of consciousness. Without immediate emergency treatment and the use of a defibrillator, death follows within minutes.”

Sudden cardiac death is the first sign of CPVT in up to 50% of cases. The disease is one of 40 or so cardiac disorders with a genetic origin that dramatically raises the risk of sudden cardiac death in otherwise healthy people.

Today, Marshall and Annmaree Hastings each have a surgically implanted cardioverter defibrillator that monitors their heart rhythms. The devices are capable of delivering an electric shock if their heart rate or rhythm should suddenly become abnormal.

“Chris is a lifesaver,” says Annmaree Hastings. “When we discovered that Marshall’s ordeal stemmed from an undiagnosed disorder with a genetic origin, Chis advised the whole family to be genetically tested. Without his counsel, I would have been a walking time bomb.”

Chris Semsarian says are three main ways to help prevent sudden heart death in fit, young athletes like Marshall, who is now an elite soccer player:

  1. Raise awareness – anyone who has had blackouts during exercise or with a family history of genetic heart disorder may be at high risk of sudden cardiac death. These people should see their GP to discuss a screening test
  2. Teach CPR in schools, sports clubs, workplaces and community settings
  3. Increasing the availability of defibrillators and people trained to use them in schools, sports clubs and community venues.

(Source: The University of Sydney)

Win 1 of 4 Pillow Pets Popables – Winners

“I’m looking forward to receiving the cute caterpillar/butterfly cuddly toy.
Thank you so much for choosing my entry as a winner!”
Winner H from VIC

Congratulations to all the winners! We hope you enjoy your prize! We had a difficult time choosing the winners, as there were a lot of very creative, funny and inspiring answers.

Name Suburb State Design
E Rong  Kogarah  NSW  Monster/Alien
H Fernee  Keilor East  VIC  Caterpillar/Butterfly
H Leung  West Pymble  NSW  Caterpillar/Butterfly
P Comerford  Northmead  NSW  Monster/Alien

 

If you are on Facebook feel free to share photos of your “prize in action” on our Facebook page.

You haven’t won this time? Don’t worry – check out our competition section. We regularly run great competitions and maybe next time you are one of the happy winners!

Please note our competitions are only open to Parenthub members who are Australian residents. If you aren’t a member yet please sign up first. Membership is free and there are great offers and benefits!

Win 1 of 10 double in-season passes to LOVE, ROSIE – Winners

Love, Rosie - movie poster

“Thank you so much. That’s so exciting!
I can’t wait to see the movie. Thank you for this opportunity.”
Winner A from VIC

Congratulations to all the winners! We hope you enjoy the movie! We had a difficult time choosing the winners, as there were a lot of very creative, funny and inspiring answers.

Name Suburb State
A Heiler  Toowoomba  QLD
A Smith  Rowville  VIC
J Alanthwaite  Wentworthville  NSW
J Smith  Manifold Heights  VIC
L Mooney  Clarkson  WA
M Roff  Waverton  NSW
M K Lee  Epping  NSW
S Thompson  Werribee  VIC
S Roney  Eaton  WA
S Towner  Ringwood North  VIC

 

You haven’t won this time? Don’t worry – check out our competition section. We regularly run great competitions and maybe next time you are one of the happy winners!

Please note our competitions are only open to Parenthub members who are Australian residents. If you aren’t a member yet please sign up first. Membership is free and there are great offers and benefits!

Youth tobacco smoking in Poland surges in step with electronic cigarette use

New study shows why tobacco industry investing millions in e-cigarettes.

A new study showing a major increase in the dual use of electronic and smoked tobacco cigarettes among Polish teenagers should ring alarm bells about the health risks electronic cigarettes could pose to young Australians, Cancer Council Australia said today.

The study, published in the Journal of Adolescent Health, showed that between 2010-11 and 2013-14 the tandem use of electronic and smoked tobacco cigarettes among 15- to 19-year-olds had increased more than five-fold from 3.6% to 21.8%.

Chair of Cancer Council Australia’s Tobacco Issues Committee, Kylie Lindorff, said the figures showed why global tobacco companies were investing so heavily in the electronic cigarette market.

“The biggest investors in the electronic cigarette market are the global tobacco companies, who clearly see electronic cigarettes as a lucrative sideline to help push their main earner, smoked tobacco products,” Ms Lindorff said. “It’s no wonder the big tobacco companies are pushing electronic cigarettes, many of which are clearly targeted at the youth market, when there is so much potential to addict a new youth market to smoked tobacco products.”

Ms Lindorff said there is an ongoing debate about whether electronic cigarettes could be a less harmful alternative to smoked tobacco products.

“This study shows there was no reduction in the use of smoked tobacco products among the electronic cigarette users,” she said. “Even more distressing, do we want to risk the health of a whole new generation of Australians by inundating the market with e-cigarettes? We have the lowest levels of youth smoking ever recorded, so there is a lot to lose in Australia. Parents should be deeply concerned about these findings.”

Ms Lindorff said Cancer Council was calling for a ban on non-nicotine e-cigarettes, most of which were fruit and confectionary flavoured and targeted at the youth market, and for tighter advertising restrictions and the banning of electronic cigarettes in smoke-free areas. The sale and possession of nicotine-based electronic cigarettes were already unlawful under poisons legislation.

(Source: Cancer Council AustraliaJournal of Adolescent Health)

Study shows parents fear stranger harm

New research from La Trobe shows half of Victorian parents worry about their children coming to harm from a stranger when they are not with an adult.

Almost half (48%) of Victorian parents of children aged nine to 15 are worried about their child’s safety when they are not with an adult because a stranger might approach them.

Victorian parents are more fearful about their child being harmed by a stranger, than they are about their child’s general safety when out in their neighbourhood without an adult.

New research by La Trobe University and the Parenting Research Centre funded by VicHealth, is the first of its kind in Australia.

It also reveals that around one third of parents avoid situations where their child goes without an adult, because they are fearful they would be approached by a stranger.

Beyond the bubble-wrap: Understanding parents’ fears in allowing their children to play and travel independently, contains the preliminary findings of a survey of more than 2000 parents.

It examines the role parental fear plays in shaping children’s independence and physical activity.

This was one of several factors that influenced what children were allowed to do on their own with regard to independent play and travel.

Lead researcher, La Trobe’s Professor Jan Nicholson said several factors influence parents’ decisions.

‘There’s issues of ‘stranger danger,’ traffic and pedestrian hazards and we also learnt that
community plays an important role. Children were more likely to be independently active when their parents viewed their neighbourhood as a supportive one, where people know and look out for one another.

‘However, disapproval from other parents, family members, and schools also restricts the level of freedom parents give to their children,’ Professor Nicholson said.

The research also shows that children’s independence is related to their gender and where they live. Parents of girls were more worried about their child’s safety and more fearful of harm to their child from strangers, than parents of boys.

On average, boys are allowed more freedom for independent play and travel than girls and the research shows that 39% of boys travel to school independently compared to 33% of girls. Children in rural and regional Victoria were also more independent than their city counterparts.

VicHealth CEO Jerril Rechter said that children who were able to play and travel without an adult and those who walk or ride to school were more likely to get the recommended one hour of physical exercise every day, which was important given rising obesity levels.

Findings from the next phase of the research will be released next year. These results aim to make it easier for parents to weigh up risks and benefits and help their children move towards appropriate independent play and travel for their age.

(Source: La Trobe University)

Hungry or not, kids will eat treats

Even though they are not hungry, children as young as three will find high-energy treats too tempting to refuse, new QUT research has found.

In a study of three and four year olds, 100% of children opted for a sweet or savory snack despite eating a filling healthy lunch only 15 minutes prior.

Nutrition researcher Holly Harris, from QUT’s Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, said the results highlighted the health risks for children frequently confronted with an abundance of energy-dense, high-calorie foods.

Ms Harris’s study, published in the journal Eating Behaviors, looked at young children’s eating habits in the absence of being hungry and how parental feeding control impacted those behaviours in both girls and boys.

“Of the 37 children who took part in the study, all children displayed eating in the absence of hunger, even though more than 80% reported being full or very full just 15 minutes earlier,” Ms Harris said.

“An impaired ability to respond to signs of feeling full and being unable to self-control food intake in an environment where children are frequently faced with high-energy foods is likely to have undesirable ramifications on a child’s energy balance and weight status.”

Ms Harris said pressure by mothers to eat was also positively linked to higher levels of snack food intake in the absence of being hungry, but this was a result found only with boys.

“Mothers who reported that they typically pressured their boys to eat during meal times, had boys who also ate more snacks when they were no longer hungry,” she said.

“This adds weight to the argument that boys’ and girls’ eating behaviours may be influenced or expressed in different ways.

“For example, in boys it may be that controlled feeding practices such as encouraging boys to finish everything on their plate may compromise their ability to determine their own hunger.

“Therefore they may be more likely to eat and overeat in the presences of highly palatable snacks.

“So forcing boys to eat their breakfast, lunch or dinner may impact their ability to self-regulate their snack food intake as well.”

She said when mothers pressured their girls to eat it did not have the same impact on their child’s snack consumption.

Ms Harris said people were born with a capacity to self-regulate their food intake.

“Infants will not consume energy in excess of what their body requires. Internal hunger and satiety signals are relayed to the brain and tell infants when to stop and start eating,” she said.

“But as we grow older, we become increasingly aware of the abundance and rewarding value of food and in turn our ability to respond appropriately to our appetite may diminish.

“In a society which constantly promotes over-consumption from convenient, energy-dense foods a susceptibility to respond to environmental food cues over appetite cues may lead to an imbalance in energy and food intake and undesirable weight gain.

“Preserving this ability to self-regulate energy intake early in life may be the key to resisting environmental stimuli to eat, later in life.”

(Source: Queensland University of Technology, Eating Behaviors)

Win a $150 makeup prize pack containing an assortment of MUD products!

Sorry, this competition is now closed.

View the winner of this competition.

Buying on-trend, affordable cosmetics is easy with MUD Make Up Design!

MUD Make Up Design is a range of colour cosmetics developed exclusively for Woolworths, with the savvy, fashion forward female in mind.

Including Nail Polishes, Lipsticks, Eyeshadow trios and a Gel Eye Liner, MUD Make Up Design is perfect for budget beauty buyers, who don’t want to sacrifice quality or style. MUD Make Up Design makes shopping for cosmetics a breeze, and grocery buying fun!

The $150 prize pack includes:

  • 10 x MUD nail polishes
  • 6 x MUD Lipsticks
  • 6 x MUD Eye Shadow Palettes
  • 6 x MUD Gel Eye Liners

Note: Shades may vary from products pictured.

Competition details:

Prizes: 1 x MUD makeup prize pack valued at $150.
Who can enter? Members only
How often? Once a day
Promotion starts: 31/10/2014
Promotion ends: 14/11/2014

How to enter

Provided you are a Parenthub member (sign up here) simply fill in the form below and answer the question.

Can’t see the form?

Then you are not logged in or you’re not yet a member! Our competitions are only open to Parenthub members who are Australian residents. If you aren’t a member yet please sign up first. Membership is free and there are great offers and benefits! Then log in, come back to this page and fill out the form.

For your chance to win tell us what is your must-have beauty product in your handbag and why? (in 25 words or less)

[PHcompetition expire=”2014-11-14″ email=”sylvia@virtualmedicalcentre.com” subject=”MUD makeup pack – Competition Entry”]

[toggle title=”Terms and Conditions”]

Participation in the Parenthub Competition (Competition) indicates your acceptance of the terms and conditions of entry set out below.

  1. The Promoter is Virtual Medical Centre.com of Level 2, 541 Hay Street, Subiaco, Western Australia 6008. Postal address is PO Box 531, Subiaco WA 6904, Australia. ABN 12097593587.  Phone: +61 (08) 9388 0344. Fax: +61 (08) 9388 0611. The prize is sponsored by The Heat Group Pty. Ltd, 35 Centre Road, Scoresby, VIC 3179, Australia.
  2. Promotional Period. The Promotion will be open from 2pm Australian Eastern Standard Time (AEST) on Friday 31 October 2014 until 2pm AEST on Friday 14 November 2014.
  3. Eligible Entrants. Entry is open to all Australian residents, aged 15 years and over, who are new or existing members of Parenthub, except employees or contractors of the Promoter or prize sponsor, and members of their immediate families. Entrants under the age of 18 must obtain the prior permission of a parent or guardian to enter.
  4. To enter you must:
    a) be a new or current Parenthub member
    b) submit an answer to the questions asked, and
    c) submit all required contact details
  5. Prizes. There is 1 (one) prize: It consists of 28 products from the MUD makeup range as listed in the prize description, RRP $150. Shades may vary from products pictured.
  6. Winners: The winners of the competition will be the people who submit an entry that the judges regard as the best in terms of creativity and originality. Chance plays no part in determining the winners. The judges’ decision is final and no correspondence will be entered into regarding their decision.
    Incomplete, illegible or incorrect entries or entries containing offensive or defamatory comments, or which breach any law or infringe any third party rights,  including intellectual property rights, are not eligible to win.
  7. Notification: The winner will be notified by email and asked for their postal address to send the prize to. The prize will then be sent to the winner by Australia Post. The prize will be sent directly by the prize sponsor. The winner may also be posted on parenthub.wpengine.com (including their name, suburb and state).
  8. Change of address: It is the entrants’ responsibility to inform the Promoter if their residential address, email address or phone number changes during the Competition Period.  Prizes will only be delivered in Australia.
  9. Unclaimed prizes: In the event that the Prize has not been claimed by 12 noon AEST 21 November 2014, subject to any directions given by State and Territory gaming departments the prize will be awarded to the next best eligible entrant as chosen by the judges.
    General Conditions
  10. Prizes are not transferable or exchangeable and are not redeemable for cash. All other costs associated with a Prize are the responsibility of the winner. The Promoter shall not be liable for any Prize that may be lost, stolen, forged, damaged or tampered with in any way before it reaches the winner.
  11. If the Promoter is unable to provide a winner with the nominated Prize, the Promoter reserves the right to supply an alternative prize of the equal or greater value, subject to any written directions given by State or Territory gaming departments.
  12. Entries will be deemed to be accepted at the time of receipt by the  Promoter. No responsibility will be taken for lost, late or misdirected  entries. The Promoter is not responsible for technical difficulties with the entry mechanism and does not warrant that the entry mechanism will  be available at all times.
  13. If, for any reason, the Promotion is not capable of running as  planned, including due to infection by computer virus, bugs, tampering,  unauthorised intervention, fraud, technical failure or any other causes  beyond the control of the Promoter, which corrupt or affect the  administration security, fairness or integrity or proper conduct of this Promotion, the Promoter reserves the right in its sole discretion to  take any action that may be available, subject to State and Territory  regulations.
  14. The Promoter reserves the right to disqualify entries in the event of non-compliance with these terms and conditions of entry. In the event there is a dispute concerning the conduct of the Promotion, the decision of the Promoter is final and binding on each entrant and no correspondence will be entered into.
  15. The Promoter reserves the right to request winners to provide proof of identity, proof of residency at the nominated prize delivery address and/or proof of entry validity in order to claim a prize. Proof of identification,  residency and entry considered suitable for verification is at the discretion of the Promoter. In the event that a winner cannot provide suitable proof, the winner will forfeit the prize in whole and no substitute will be offered.
  16. The Promoter makes no representations or warranties as to the  quality/suitability/merchantability of any of the goods/services offered as prizes. The Promoter or prize sponsor shall not be liable for any damage or loss whatsoever which is suffered (including but not limited to indirect or consequential loss) or any personal injury suffered or sustained in connection with this promotion, except for any liability which cannot be excluded by law.
  17. By entering the competition, each entrant agrees to the use of their 25 word statement for printing, broadcast, publicity and promotional purposes, without compensation, and agrees that the Promoter will own all intellectual property rights, in any such material.
  18. The personal information provided by participants to the Promoter  may be used by the Promoter for the purpose of conducting the Competition. The Promoter is bound by the provisions of the Privacy Act 1988.

[/toggle]

Win 1 of 5 Little Miracles photo shoot packages!

Sorry, this competition is now closed.

Thanks to Starshots Photography we are giving away 5 ‘Expectant Mother’ makeover and photo shoot packages.

LM_Stage-2_Newborn-Portrait-StarshotsGrowing and changing so quickly, for many expecting couples looking to capture this life changing journey; Starshots, Australia’s leading portrait photography network has created the Little Miracles Package for expectant mums to be.

Three full photographic sessions for you and your baby in one magnificent package. From Stage 1- Expectant mum to Stage 2 – Mum/Dad and Newborn through to Stage 3 – Baby’s 1st birthday…

LM_Stage-3_First-Bday-Portrait-StarshotsEach session consisting of:

  • Professional hair and make-up
  • Multiple wardrobe changes
  • Professional studio session
  • Instant viewing and image selection

PLUS 2 Special gifts of

  • A 10 pack of announcement cards with your baby’s portrait from your 2nd session ($49 RRP)
  • An 11 x 14” photographic portrait from your 3rd session ($295 value)

As time spent for you with your little miracle, what better way to capture the excitement of those first months.

Terms and Conditions:
You’ll find 15 convenient studios locations in NSW, QLD, SA, VIC and WA to redeem your gift voucher prize (see locations below).
Bookings are available for Midweek sessions only. Valid for one year from date of receipt of prize.
Cannot be used in conjunction with any other offer. Special gift of announcement cards available from 2nd session only. Special gift of 1 x 11”x14” portrait available from 3rd session only.
Extra persons can be added to the session from just $50 per adult and $25 per child.
You must contact your nominated studio (by phone or in person) to add any extra persons.
Session times can be rescheduled as long as 48 hours’ notice is given. Failure to provide this notice may result in cancellation of session.

Studio Locations:
Visit the Starshots website for locating a studio:

NSW:
Bankstown, Caringbah, Central Coast, Darlinghurst, Parramatta, Penrith

QLD:
Fortitude Valley, Maroochydore, Surfers Paradise

VIC:
Ascot Vale, Brighton, Fountain Gate, Wantirna

Partner studios in WA and SA, where you can also redeem the vouchers:

SA:
Adelaide: Gainsborough Studio

WA:

Fremantle: Freedom Photography
Perth: Archer Imagery

 

Competition details:

Prizes: 5 x Little Miracles photo shoot packages valued at $99 each.
Who can enter? Australian residents, Members only
How often? Once a day
Promotion starts: 31/10/2014
Promotion ends: 14/11/2014

How to enter

Provided you are a Parenthub member (sign up here) and logged in, simply fill in the form below and answer the question.

Can’t see the form?

Then you forgot to log in or you’re not yet a member! Our competitions are only open to Parenthub members who are Australian residents. If you aren’t a member yet please sign up first. Membership is free and there are great offers and benefits! Then log in, come back to this page and fill out the form.

For your chance to win tell us why you would love to win this voucher! (in 25 words or less)

[PHcompetition expire=”2014-11-14″ email=”sylvia@virtualmedicalcentre.com” subject=”LITTLE MIRACLES photo shoot package – Competition Entry”]

[toggle title=”Terms and Conditions”]

Participation in the Parenthub Competition (Competition) indicates your acceptance of the terms and conditions of entry set out below.

  1. The Promoter is Virtual Medical Centre.com of Level 2, 541 Hay Street, Subiaco, Western Australia 6008. Postal address is PO Box 531, Subiaco WA 6904, Australia. ABN 12097593587.  Phone: +61 (08) 9388 0344. Fax: +61 (08) 9388 0611. The prize is sponsored by Starshots Photography, Level 1, 113-115 Oxford Street, Darlinghurst, NSW 2010 .
  2. Promotional Period. The Promotion will be open from 2pm Australian Eastern Standard Time (AEST) on Friday 31 October 2014 until 2pm AEST on Friday 14 November 2014.
  3. Eligible Entrants. Entry is open to all Australian residents, aged 15 years and over, who are new or existing members of Parenthub, except employees or contractors of the Promoter or prize sponsor, and members of their immediate families. Entrants under the age of 18 must obtain the prior permission of a parent or guardian to enter.
  4. To enter you must:
    a) be a new or current Parenthub member
    b) submit an answer to the questions asked, and
    c) submit all required contact details
  5. Prizes. There are 5 (five) prizes: Each consists of one Little Miracles photo shoot package valued at $99 each. Total prize pool is RRP $495.00.
  6. Winners: The winners of the competition will be the people who submit an entry that the judges regard as the best in terms of creativity and originality. Chance plays no part in determining the winners. The judges’ decision is final and no correspondence will be entered into regarding their decision.
    Incomplete, illegible or incorrect entries or entries containing offensive or defamatory comments, or which breach any law or infringe any third party rights,  including intellectual property rights, are not eligible to win.
  7. Notification: Winners will be notified by email and asked for their postal address to send the prize to. The prizes will then be sent to the winners by Australia Post. The winners may also be posted on parenthub.wpengine.com (including their name, suburb and state).
  8. Change of address: It is the entrants’ responsibility to inform the Promoter if their residential address, email address or phone number changes during the Competition Period.  Prizes will only be delivered in Australia.
  9. Unclaimed prizes: In the event that the Prize has not been claimed by 12 noon AEST 21 November 2014, subject to any directions given by State and Territory gaming departments the prize will be awarded to the next best eligible entrant as chosen by the judges.
    General Conditions
  10. Prizes are not transferable or exchangeable and are not redeemable for cash. All other costs associated with a Prize are the responsibility of the winner. The Promoter shall not be liable for any Prize that may be lost, stolen, forged, damaged or tampered with in any way before it reaches the winner.
  11. If the Promoter is unable to provide a winner with the nominated Prize, the Promoter reserves the right to supply an alternative prize of the equal or greater value, subject to any written directions given by State or Territory gaming departments.
  12. Entries will be deemed to be accepted at the time of receipt by the  Promoter. No responsibility will be taken for lost, late or misdirected  entries. The Promoter is not responsible for technical difficulties with the entry mechanism and does not warrant that the entry mechanism will  be available at all times.
  13. If, for any reason, the Promotion is not capable of running as  planned, including due to infection by computer virus, bugs, tampering,  unauthorised intervention, fraud, technical failure or any other causes  beyond the control of the Promoter, which corrupt or affect the  administration security, fairness or integrity or proper conduct of this Promotion, the Promoter reserves the right in its sole discretion to  take any action that may be available, subject to State and Territory  regulations.
  14. The Promoter reserves the right to disqualify entries in the event of non-compliance with these terms and conditions of entry. In the event there is a dispute concerning the conduct of the Promotion, the decision of the Promoter is final and binding on each entrant and no correspondence will be entered into.
  15. The Promoter reserves the right to request winners to provide proof of identity, proof of residency at the nominated prize delivery address and/or proof of entry validity in order to claim a prize. Proof of identification,  residency and entry considered suitable for verification is at the discretion of the Promoter. In the event that a winner cannot provide suitable proof, the winner will forfeit the prize in whole and no substitute will be offered.
  16. The Promoter makes no representations or warranties as to the  quality/suitability/merchantability of any of the goods/services offered as prizes. The Promoter or prize sponsor shall not be liable for any damage or loss whatsoever which is suffered (including but not limited to indirect or consequential loss) or any personal injury suffered or sustained in connection with this promotion, except for any liability which cannot be excluded by law.
  17. By entering the competition, each entrant agrees to the use of their 25 word statement for printing, broadcast, publicity and promotional purposes, without compensation, and agrees that the Promoter will own all intellectual property rights, in any such material.
  18. The personal information provided by participants to the Promoter  may be used by the Promoter for the purpose of conducting the Competition. The Promoter is bound by the provisions of the Privacy Act 1988.

[/toggle]

 

Win 1 of 10 double in-season passes to SERENA

Serena movie poster

Sorry, this competition is now closed.

View the winners of this competition.

Thanks to STUDIOCANAL we are giving away 10 double in-season passes to SERENA, each valued at $38.

North Carolina mountains at the end of the 1920s – George and Serena Pemberton, love-struck newly-weds, begin to build a timber empire and refuse to let anyone stand in the way of their inflated love and ambitions. However, once Serena discovers George’s hidden past and faces an unchangeable fate of her own, the Pemberton’s passionate marriage begins to unravel leading toward a dramatic reckoning.

View trailer here.

IN CINEMAS November 27

Cast: Bradley Cooper, Jennifer Lawrence

Competition details:

Prizes: 10 double in-season passes to SERENA, each valued at $38.
Who can enter? Members only
How often? Once a day
Promotion starts: 31/10/2014
Promotion ends: 14/11/2014

How to enter

Provided you are a Parenthub member (sign up here) and logged in, simply fill in the form below and answer the question.

Can’t see the form?

Then you forgot to log in or you’re not yet a member! Our competitions are only open to Parenthub members who are Australian residents. If you aren’t a member yet please sign up first. Membership is free and there are great offers and benefits! Then log in, come back to this page and fill out the form.

To enter, tell us what do you find the most important quality of a good marriage? (in 25 words or less)

[PHcompetition expire=”2014-11-14″ email=”sylvia@virtualmedicalcentre.com” subject=”PH Competition – SERENA”]

[toggle title=”Terms and Conditions”]

Participation in the Parenthub Competition (Competition) indicates your acceptance of the terms and conditions of entry set out below.

  1. The Promoter is Virtual Medical Centre.com of Level 2, 541 Hay Street, Subiaco, Western Australia 6008. Postal address is PO Box 531, Subiaco WA 6904, Australia. ABN 12097593587.  Phone: +61 (08) 9388 0344. Fax: +61 (08) 9388 0611. The prize is sponsored by STUDIOCANAL Pty Limited, Level 50, 680 George Street, Sydney, NSW 2000, AUSTRALIA.
  2. Promotional Period. The Promotion will be open from 2pm Australian Eastern Standard Time (AEST) on Friday 31 Octobert 2014 until 2pm AEST on Friday 14 November 2014.
  3. Eligible Entrants. Entry is open to all Australian residents, aged 15 years and over, who are new or existing members of Parenthub, except employees or contractors of the Promoter or prize sponsor, and members of their immediate families. Entrants under the age of 18 must obtain the prior permission of a parent or guardian to enter.
  4. To enter you must:
    a) be a new or current Parenthub member
    b) submit an answer to the questions asked, and
    c) submit all required contact details
  5. Prizes. There are 10 (ten) prizes. Each consists of a double in-season pass to SERENA, valued at $38. Total prize pool RRP $380.
  6. Tickets are valid from opening day at participating Hoyts Cinemas, Village Cinemas, Reading Cinemas, EVENT, Greater Union, Birch, Carroll & Coyle Cinemas, Australian Multiplex Cinemas, Wallis and participating independent cinemas. Not valid for Gold Class; Special Event sessions or VMAX at Village Cinemas. Not valid for Gold Class and VMAX at EVENT Cinemas. Not valid for Gold Class and VMAX at Greater Union and Birch Carroll & Coyle Cinemas. Not valid for La Premiere, Directors Suite, Bean Bag Cinema, Xtremescreen or IMAX at Hoyts Cinemas. Not valid at Gold Lounge or Titan XC at Reading Cinemas. Not valid for Regal Twin Graceville, Ace Gold Lounge Cinemas and Hayden Orpheum Cinemas. Not valid at Dendy Premium or Lounge Cinemas.
    The tickets are not valid Tuesdays (or cinema discount days), after 5pm on Saturdays or Public Holidays. Valid even when “No Free Tickets” restrictions apply. This ticket must be taken as offered & is not transferable, exchangeable or redeemable for cash. Seating is subject to availability. This pass does not guarantee admission.
  7. Winners: The winners of the competition will be the people who submit an entry that the judges regard as the best in terms of creativity and originality. Chance plays no part in determining the winners. The judges’ decision is final and no correspondence will be entered into regarding their decision.
    Incomplete, illegible or incorrect entries or entries containing offensive or defamatory comments, or which breach any law or infringe any third party rights,  including intellectual property rights, are not eligible to win.
  8. Notification: Winners will be notified by email and asked for their postal address to send the prize to. The prize sponsor will then send the prizes to the winners’ contact addresses. The winners may also be posted on parenthub.wpengine.com (including their name, suburb and state).
  9. Change of address: It is the entrants’ responsibility to inform the Promoter if their residential address, email address or phone number changes during the Competition Period.  Prizes will only be delivered in Australia.
  10. Unclaimed prizes: In the event that the Prize has not been claimed by 12 noon AEST 21 November 2014, subject to any directions given by State and Territory gaming departments the prize will be awarded to the next best eligible entrant as chosen by the judges.
    General Conditions
  11. Prizes are not transferable or exchangeable and are not redeemable for cash. All other costs associated with a Prize are the responsibility of the winner. The Promoter shall not be liable for any Prize that may be lost, stolen, forged, damaged or tampered with in any way before it reaches the winner.
  12. If the Promoter is unable to provide a winner with the nominated Prize, the Promoter reserves the right to supply an alternative prize of the equal or greater value, subject to any written directions given by State or Territory gaming departments.
  13. Entries will be deemed to be accepted at the time of receipt by the  Promoter. No responsibility will be taken for lost, late or misdirected  entries. The Promoter is not responsible for technical difficulties with the entry mechanism and does not warrant that the entry mechanism will  be available at all times.
  14. If, for any reason, the Promotion is not capable of running as  planned, including due to infection by computer virus, bugs, tampering,  unauthorised intervention, fraud, technical failure or any other causes  beyond the control of the Promoter, which corrupt or affect the  administration security, fairness or integrity or proper conduct of this Promotion, the Promoter reserves the right in its sole discretion to  take any action that may be available, subject to State and Territory  regulations.
  15. The Promoter reserves the right to disqualify entries in the event of non-compliance with these terms and conditions of entry. In the event there is a dispute concerning the conduct of the Promotion, the decision of the Promoter is final and binding on each entrant and no correspondence will be entered into.
  16. The Promoter reserves the right to request winners to provide proof of identity, proof of residency at the nominated prize delivery address and/or proof of entry validity in order to claim a prize. Proof of identification,  residency and entry considered suitable for verification is at the discretion of the Promoter. In the event that a winner cannot provide suitable proof, the winner will forfeit the prize in whole and no substitute will be offered.
  17. The Promoter makes no representations or warranties as to the  quality/suitability/merchantability of any of the goods/services offered as prizes. The Promoter or prize sponsor shall not be liable for any damage or loss whatsoever which is suffered (including but not limited to indirect or consequential loss) or any personal injury suffered or sustained in connection with this promotion, except for any liability which cannot be excluded by law.
  18. By entering the competition, each entrant agrees to the use of their 25 word statement for printing, broadcast, publicity and promotional purposes, without compensation, and agrees that the Promoter will own all intellectual property rights, in any such material.
  19. The personal information provided by participants to the Promoter  may be used by the Promoter for the purpose of conducting the Competition. The Promoter is bound by the provisions of the Privacy Act 1988.

[/toggle]

- Advertisement -

Sign up to receive the latest parenting news, competitions, health information, baby/child/whole family recipes, play ideas, outings, personal stories and much more.

Subscribe