Fines For Dangerous Toy Retailers

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Fines For Dangerous Toy Retailers

Hot on the heels of the publication of this year’s dangerous goods Christmas toys list, NSW Fair Trading has announced the successful prosecution of two retail outlets for selling non-compliant children’s toys resulting in costs and fines of more than $17,000.

Fair Trading Commissioner Rod Stowe said Parramatta store, Leelana Toys and Things had sold toys for children aged three and under that were not compliant under the Australian Consumer Law.

“Valentine Hortle and Varuksana Kunruka were each ordered to pay $5,256 in fines and costs by Parramatta Local court this month for supplying novelty items including Peppa Pig squeaky toys, Thomas the Tank Engine talking trains and bumping cars aimed at young children,’ Mr Stowe said.

“Selling dangerous toys that specifically appeal to very young kids demonstrates a complete disregard for children’s welfare and contempt for legislation that is in place for the protection of consumers.”

In a separate case, Rooty Hill Discounts shop owner Li Fang Dong, 59, was ordered to pay $6,884 in fines and costs for selling dangerous items aimed at young children, including a toy gun with suction cup projectiles, a mini ironing set and novelty children’s instruments including pianos, xylophones and recorders.

“This result sends a strong message to suppliers that Fair Trading will take strong and swift action when young lives are put at risk.”

While toys in today’s marketplace are generally much safer than a decade ago, each year Fair Trading detects new products which have the potential to cause injury or even death to young children. Toys with small parts are a particular worry. Anything smaller than a ping pong ball or an Australian 20 cent coin could choke a child less than three years old.

Mr Stowe said Fair Trading would continue to make unannounced visits to traders across NSW to ensure compliance with product safety requirements.

“Consumers should have the confidence to walk into a store knowing dangerous goods are not being offered for sale, and that goods have been vetted for safety before they are placed on the shelves,” he said.

(Source: Australian Competition & Consumer Commission)

Date Created: December 27, 2015

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