tumor

What’s in Store for Survivors of Childhood Cancers that Affect Vision?
What’s in Store for Survivors of Childhood Cancers that Affect Vision? (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)

Little is known about the long-term health of survivors of childhood cancers that affect vision, but two new studies provide valuable insights that could impact patient care and follow-up. The findings are published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal ... Read More »

Study exposes link between pesticides and childhood brain tumours
Study exposes link between pesticides and childhood brain tumours (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

A new study from the Telethon Institute for Child Health Research has revealed a potential link between professional pesticide treatments in the home and a higher risk of children developing brain tumours. Published in the international journal Cancer Causes & ... Read More »

Drugs for children with brain tumours need tuning
Drugs for children with brain tumours need tuning (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

Pediatric researchers, investigating the biology of brain tumors in children, are finding that crucial differences in how the same gene is mutated may call for different treatments. A new study offers glimpses into how scientists will be using the ongoing ... Read More »

More reseach needed into mums smoking and childhood brain tumours
More reseach needed into mums smoking and childhood brain tumours (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

Researchers from Perth’s Telethon Institute for Child Health Research are calling for further investigation into a potential link between maternal smoking and childhood brain tumours. It follows the results of a new study which showed a possible connection between maternal ... Read More »

Mums smoking linked to childhood brain tumours
Mums smoking linked to childhood brain tumours (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

Researchers from Perth’s Telethon Institute for Child Health Research are calling for further investigation into a potential link between maternal smoking and childhood brain tumours. It follows the results of a new study which showed a possible connection between maternal ... Read More »

Experts pledge global assault on kids’ cancer
Experts pledge global assault on kids’ cancer (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

A global action plan to tackle one of the most aggressive types of childhood brain tumours will be developed as a result of an unprecedented meeting of international experts in Western Australia. Funded by The Telethon Adventurers, the 3-day ‘Global ... Read More »

Childhood cancer tumours grow quickly, leaving fewer obvious treatment targets
Childhood cancer tumours grow quickly, leaving fewer obvious treatment targets (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

An extensive genomic study of the childhood cancer neuroblastoma reinforces the challenges in treating the most aggressive forms of this disease. Contrary to expectations, the scientists found relatively few recurrent gene mutations—mutations that would suggest new targets for neuroblastoma treatment. ... Read More »

Many causes for learning lags in tumor disorder
Many causes for learning lags in tumor disorder (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

The causes of learning problems associated with an inherited brain tumor disorder are much more complex than scientists had anticipated, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis report. The disorder, neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1), is among the most ... Read More »

Blood flow changes, not hormones, explain growth of benign tumors in pregnant women
Blood flow changes, not hormones, explain growth of benign tumors in pregnant women (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

Meningiomas are a common type of benign brain tumor that sometimes grows dramatically in pregnant women. A new study suggests that this sudden tumor growth likely results from “hemodynamic changes” associated with pregnancy, reports the November issue of Neurosurgery, fficial ... Read More »

 
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