post partum

New drug to ease C-Section trauma
New drug to ease C-Section trauma (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

James Cook University researchers from the College of Medicine and Dentistry may have found a way to reduce trauma and prevent infections after Caesarean births. Caesarean delivery rates are increasing worldwide and around a third of all mothers in Australia, ... Read More »

Breastfeeding twice as likely after home births than hospital births
Breastfeeding twice as likely after home births than hospital births (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)

A new study by academics in Trinity College Dublin has found that there is a strong positive relationship between planned birth at home and breast feeding: breastfeeding was twice as likely after planned home births compared to hospital births. The ... Read More »

Mums encouraged to switch off for their mental health
Mums encouraged to switch off for their mental health (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)

A world first Australian study has found a link between modern screen-based sedentary behaviours and anxiety risk in mothers of young children aged under five years. The study, “Associations between Screen-Based Sedentary Behaviour and Anxiety Symptoms in Mothers with Young ... Read More »

‘Love’ Hormone and Mother-Infant Bonding
‘Love’ Hormone and Mother-Infant Bonding (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

Widely referred to as the “love” hormone, oxytocin is an indispensable part of childbirth and emotional mother-child bonding. Psychologists at Florida Atlantic University are conducting a novel study to determine how a mother’s levels of oxytocin might be different in ... Read More »

Program cuts post-natal mental disorders dramatically
Program cuts post-natal mental disorders dramatically (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)

In a world first, published in BMJ Open, new Australian research from Monash University has shown that post-natal mental health problems can be reduced by up to two-thirds through an innovative program. The program, called What Were We Thinking! (WWWT), was developed ... Read More »

Traumatic vaginal births putting women at risk of chronic problems
Traumatic vaginal births putting women at risk of chronic problems (2 votes, average: 4.00 out of 5)

Pregnant women need better information about the risks associated with vaginal births, new research finds. “Mothers do much more damage to themselves when having babies than we were aware of in the past,” says Dr Peter Dietz, Professor of Obstetrics ... Read More »

Saving mothers from deadly haemorrhage
Saving mothers from deadly haemorrhage (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)

While Australia may be one of the safest places on earth to give birth, new research is now focussing on severe postpartum haemorrhage which continues to be a rare and mysterious killer. A collaboration led by University of Technology Sydney ... Read More »

Misunderstood mothers-to-be internalise stress
Misunderstood mothers-to-be internalise stress (2 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

The role that stigma around mental health plays in the stress of a pregnancy – and birth complications – has been thrust into the spotlight by a study from researchers at The University of Queensland. PhD candidate Aleksandra Staneva from ... Read More »

Improving post-natal care
Improving post-natal care (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)

What impact do modern parents’ behaviours have on the early physical development and maturity of infants? This question is being answered in a ground-breaking Western Australian study. The I-Chat study is investigating the influence of parents’ caregiving and the physical ... Read More »

Checking and rechecking – Is baby still breathing?
Checking and rechecking – Is baby still breathing? (2 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

A new mother may constantly worry and check to see if her baby is still breathing. Or she may fret about germs, obsessing whether she’s properly sterilized the bottles, then wash and rewash them. A new Northwestern Medicine study found ... Read More »

 
close

Join our FREE monthly Newsletter!

Simply enter your email and first name below:

Parenthub respects your privacy. You can unsubscribe from the newsletter at any time.
Please read our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.