obesity

Australia’s first family obesity service opens
Australia’s first family obesity service opens (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)

Australia’s first family-centred, multidisciplinary clinic to help mums, dads and kids tackle obesity and achieve a healthy weight was officially opened by NSW Health Minister Brad Hazzard. Mr Hazzard said the Nepean Blue Mountains Family Obesity Service was unique because ... Read More »

Parents’ Use of Emotional Feeding Increases Emotional Eating in School-Age Children
Parents’ Use of Emotional Feeding Increases Emotional Eating in School-Age Children (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)

Emotional eating—eating when you feel sad or upset or in response to another negative mood—is not uncommon in children and adolescents, but why youth eat emotionally has been unclear. Now a new longitudinal study from Norway has found that school-age ... Read More »

Outcomes for home and birth centre births
Outcomes for home and birth centre births (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

Women with some characteristics commonly thought to increase pregnancy risks – being over age 35; being overweight; and in some cases, having a vaginal birth after a caesarean section – tend to have good outcomes when they give birth at ... Read More »

Early periods associated with risk of gestational diabetes
Early periods associated with risk of gestational diabetes (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

The age at which girls start menstruating could flag a later risk of diabetes during pregnancy, according to a University of Queensland study. UQ School of Public Health researchers analysed data from more than 4700 women from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health and ... Read More »

Eating together is more fulfilling
Eating together is more fulfilling (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)

Making food the core of people’s daily routine need not breed a nation of fatties, says Professor Claude Fischler, a Visiting International Research Fellow at Flinders School of Health Sciences. Collective engagement at regular mealtimes not only encourages more attention ... Read More »

Impact of parent physical activity, sedentary behaviour on their preschool children
Impact of parent physical activity, sedentary behaviour on their preschool children (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)

Young children do follow in their parents’ footsteps. Literally. That’s the conclusion of NIH-funded researchers who found that in underserved populations, parents’ physical activity—and their sedentary behaviour—directly correlates with the activity level of their preschoolers. Researchers say these findings, published ... Read More »

Step up for child health research – Register for Stepathon 2017
Step up for child health research – Register for Stepathon 2017 (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)

Murdoch Childrens Research Institute want all children to have the opportunity to live a healthy and fulfilled life! Which is why we are inviting kids, adults, grandparents, families and friends to join Stepathon, our national campaign that aims to raise ... Read More »

Lap band surgery benefits very obese adolescents
Lap band surgery benefits very obese adolescents (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)

Lap band surgery has significant benefits for severely obese teenagers and, despite its controversial nature, should still be considered as a first option to manage obesity during adolescence, a new study has found. Led by University of Adelaide researchers, in ... Read More »

Overweight or obesity often start during primary school
Overweight or obesity often start during primary school (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

Every year 57,100 children who started primary school in England at a healthy weight end up obese or overweight by the time they leave, according to new statistics* published by Cancer Research UK. This worrying statistic adds to the fact ... Read More »

Children who watch lots of TV have weaker bones in adulthood
Children who watch lots of TV have weaker bones in adulthood (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)

Curtin University researchers have found children who spend a lot of time watching television, have poorer and weaker bones in young adulthood which could significantly impact their health in later life. Lead researcher Dr Joanne McVeigh, Curtin’s School of Occupational ... Read More »

 
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