language

AusE babies trump their peers at word learning
AusE babies trump their peers at word learning (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

New research has found that Australian babies fare better than babies of other English speaking countries at word learning. At just 17-months-old, infants with Australian English (AusE) as their native language can already encode highly dynamic acoustic properties in speech, ... Read More »

Dad’s reading is new chapter of child language development
Dad’s reading is new chapter of child language development (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)

Fathers, as well as mothers, are being encouraged to read to their kids after new research has shown the impact dads can have on their child’s language development. The latest research from the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute (MCRI) has opened ... Read More »

Adopted babies can remember their birth language
Adopted babies can remember their birth language (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)

New research has discovered that early language learning in children adopted internationally can be subconsciously retained, even when they can no longer remember the learning experience. This means that even in the very early months of life, useful language knowledge ... Read More »

Late language emergence in toddlers
Late language emergence in toddlers (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)

Australian children have been the focus of pioneering studies of early language development. These contemporary Australian population studies of language growth and patterns over time are producing a vastly different picture from the boutique studies of the early 1970’s that ... Read More »

Pattern learning key to children’s language development
Pattern learning key to children’s language development (2 votes, average: 4.00 out of 5)

A new study reveals children’s language development is a learnt skill and is intricately linked to their ability to recognise patterns in their environment. Conducted by researchers from the University of Sydney and Australian National University, the study found children ... Read More »

What’s in a nickname?
What’s in a nickname? (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

You can’t choose your own nickname. That much is clear. But understanding how these monikers come to be is the basis of a study that aims to help students understand linguistic concepts. Dr Donna Starks from La Trobe University, Dr ... Read More »

Bilingual community to share experiences at workshop
Bilingual community to share experiences at workshop (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)

A group of children from diverse language backgrounds, including Dinka, Korean, Tagalog and Afrikaans, have shared their experiences growing up bilingual in Australia. The meeting was part of a new series of University of Southern Queensland (USQ) workshops underway in ... Read More »

How learning to talk is in the genes
How learning to talk is in the genes (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)

An international study by child health researchers has found that genetic factors contribute to the development of language during infancy. The results, published in Nature Communications, shed further light on a specific genetic region on chromosome 3, which has been ... Read More »

Role for parents in high school English lessons
Role for parents in high school English lessons (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)

The sheer range of texts their children study over the course of a year in a high school English class can be daunting for parents. Children could study Shakespeare, The Simpsons and World of Warcraft all in a single term. ... Read More »

Multilingual resources for teaching the alphabet
Multilingual resources for teaching the alphabet (6 votes, average: 4.50 out of 5)

It’s never too early to start teaching your child a second language, in fact the younger they start learning, the more easily children seem to learn to speak another language. But there’s more to being bilingual than knowing how to speak. ... Read More »

 
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