labour

More Extremely Preterm Babies Survive
More Extremely Preterm Babies Survive (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

Babies born at just 22 to 24 weeks of pregnancy continue to have sobering outlooks – only about 1 in 3 survive. But according to a new study led by Duke Health and appearing Feb. 16 in the New England Journal of ... Read More »

Early indicators of preterm birth
Early indicators of preterm birth (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)

A new study could pave the way for a simple blood or saliva test to predict whether an expectant mother is likely to have a preterm birth. Dr Carlos Salomon from The University of Queensland and Dr Ramkumar Menon from the University of Texas will investigate early ... Read More »

Predicting premmies: one simple test to revolutionise childbirth in Australia
Predicting premmies: one simple test to revolutionise childbirth in Australia (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)

A simple bedside test for pregnant women to accurately predict early labour is under development at the University of Melbourne. Researchers are working towards the affordable, painless and reliable test, that could be taken at 24-weeks pregnant, giving doctors a ... Read More »

Going to hospital for childbirth
Going to hospital for childbirth (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

It’s easy to forget to pack important things, and not remember them until you’ve already walked out the door, or arrived at work or your holiday destination. It’s especially easy to forget things if you’re leaving the house in a ... Read More »

Signals that trigger labour and delivery
Signals that trigger labour and delivery (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

In a normal full-term pregnancy, signals from the mature organs of the foetus and the aging placental membranes and placenta prompt the uterus’ muscular walls to begin the labour and delivery process. It’s still unclear how these signals accomplish this ... Read More »

Nose spray for pain relief in childbirth is not to be sniffed at
Nose spray for pain relief in childbirth is not to be sniffed at (3 votes, average: 3.67 out of 5)

Pain relief during childbirth could soon be delivered via a self-administered nasal spray, thanks to research from University of South Australia midwifery researcher, Dr Julie Fleet. Well known for its use in delivering pain relief to children and in managing ... Read More »

World-first simulation training improves management of home birth emergencies
World-first simulation training improves management of home birth emergencies (2 votes, average: 4.00 out of 5)

While home births are a safe and appropriate choice for healthy women with low-risk pregnancies, the small risk of an emergency requires immediate and skilled management by midwives. A home birth simulation workshop developed by Monash University and Monash Health ... Read More »

Baby steps to easing labour pain
Baby steps to easing labour pain (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)

One in three women experience severe back pain during labour and birth, but that might change thanks to a safe, simple and effective treatment developed by University of Queensland researchers. Professor Sue Kildea and Dr Nigel Lee from the Mater Research Institute-UQ are ... Read More »

Giving women more choice when inducing labour
Giving women more choice when inducing labour (2 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

New research suggests that if given the choice, pregnant women who are due to have their labour induced would prefer to go home than stay in hospital overnight. The study, led by researchers at the Women’s and Children’s Hospital and ... Read More »

Key to triggering labour in pregnancy
Key to triggering labour in pregnancy (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

Australian researchers have identified an electrical switch in the muscle of the uterus that can control labour and may help explain why overweight pregnant women have difficulty giving birth. The world-first discovery, published today in Nature Communications, is a result ... Read More »

 
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