genetic

Breakthrough in cleft lip and palate research
Breakthrough in cleft lip and palate research (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)

Four genes have been identified which work together to cause cleft lip and palate, in an international research collaboration with researchers from UNSW Sydney and the University of Washington. The genes, associated for the first time with cleft lip and ... Read More »

Blood sample breakthrough good news for pregnant women
Blood sample breakthrough good news for pregnant women (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)

A wide range of foetal genetic abnormalities could soon be detected in early pregnancy thanks to a world-first study led by University of South Australia researchers using lab-on-a-chip, non-invasive technology. Biomedical engineers Dr Marnie Winter and Professor Benjamin Thierry from ... Read More »

Genetic signature predicts diabetes diagnosis
Genetic signature predicts diabetes diagnosis (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)

University of Queensland researchers have found a way to identify infants who will go on to develop type 1 diabetes. UQ Diamantina Institute researcher Professor Ranjeny Thomas said the discovery would lead to the development of better screening tests to ... Read More »

Rare genetic breakthrough for pathology team
Rare genetic breakthrough for pathology team (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

An Adelaide couple’s struggle to start a family has resulted in the discovery of a new rare genetic disorder, diagnosed by specialists from UniSA’s Centre for Cancer Biology and the Women’s and Children’s Hospital. Vijay Mahalingham and his wife Sharmila ... Read More »

Genes not to blame for toothaches
Genes not to blame for toothaches (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)

Researchers, including those from the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute (MCRI), for the first time have looked into the role genes and environment on play in the composition of the oral microbiome and its role in the formation of tooth decay ... Read More »

Parental age influences new genetic mutations in children
Parental age influences new genetic mutations in children (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

The older the parent – especially the father – the higher the incidence of new genetic mutations in the offspring, according to a paper published online this week in Nature. The paper also reports the largest resource to date of ... Read More »

Father’s diet impacts on son’s ability to reproduce
Father’s diet impacts on son’s ability to reproduce (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)

New research involving Monash University biologists has debunked the view that males just pass on genetic material and not much else to their offspring. Instead, it found a father’s diet can affect their son’s ability to out-compete a rival’s sperm after mating. The study sought ... Read More »

The reasons for our left or right-handedness
The reasons for our left or right-handedness (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)

Unlike hitherto assumed, the cause is not to be found in the brain. It is not the brain that determines if people are right or left-handed, but the spinal cord. This has been inferred from the research results compiled by ... Read More »

Autism severity linked to genetics and ultrasound
Autism severity linked to genetics and ultrasound (2 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

For children with autism and a class of genetic disorders, exposure to diagnostic ultrasound in the first trimester of pregnancy is linked to increased autism severity, according to study results reported Sept. 1. The study was conducted by researchers at ... Read More »

Predicting academic achievement from DNA
Predicting academic achievement from DNA (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

Scientists from King’s College London have used a new genetic scoring technique to predict academic achievement from DNA alone. This is the strongest prediction from DNA of a behavioural measure to date. The research shows that a genetic score comprising ... Read More »

 
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