childhood cancer

Childhood cancer survivors need more support at school
Childhood cancer survivors need more support at school (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

Australia is lagging behind the US and Europe in providing consistent services to help childhood cancer survivors successfully reintegrate into their schools, UNSW cancer specialists and psychologists say. “This is an issue that society is blind to, and it’s not just cancer ... Read More »

What’s in Store for Survivors of Childhood Cancers that Affect Vision?
What’s in Store for Survivors of Childhood Cancers that Affect Vision? (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)

Little is known about the long-term health of survivors of childhood cancers that affect vision, but two new studies provide valuable insights that could impact patient care and follow-up. The findings are published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal ... Read More »

Acupuncture effective for chronic pain in children
Acupuncture effective for chronic pain in children (2 votes, average: 4.00 out of 5)

It is upsetting to see anyone in pain, but it’s especially heartbreaking to watch a child endure chronic pain. In addition to the suffering itself, chronic pain can cause traumatic effects on a child’s quality of life, and it can ... Read More »

Immunotherapy showed promising antileukemia activity in pediatric patients
Immunotherapy showed promising antileukemia activity in pediatric patients (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

Researchers using patients’ own immune cells in an immunotherapy approach called “anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy,” achieved responses in children whose acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) had returned after a bone marrow transplant, according to preliminary results presented at ... Read More »

Drugs for children with brain tumours need tuning
Drugs for children with brain tumours need tuning (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

Pediatric researchers, investigating the biology of brain tumors in children, are finding that crucial differences in how the same gene is mutated may call for different treatments. A new study offers glimpses into how scientists will be using the ongoing ... Read More »

Cancer doesn’t change young girl’s desire to have children
Cancer doesn’t change young girl’s desire to have children (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

Researchers at Moffitt Cancer Center and colleagues have found that healthy adolescent females have predetermined expectations for becoming parents in the future, but have concerns about fertility and childbearing should they develop a life-threatening illness, such as cancer. According to ... Read More »

Experts pledge global assault on kids’ cancer
Experts pledge global assault on kids’ cancer (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

A global action plan to tackle one of the most aggressive types of childhood brain tumours will be developed as a result of an unprecedented meeting of international experts in Western Australia. Funded by The Telethon Adventurers, the 3-day ‘Global ... Read More »

Dad’s obesity linked to child’s risk of disease
Dad’s obesity linked to child’s risk of disease (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

A father’s obesity is one factor that may influence his children’s health and potentially raise their risk for diseases like cancer, according to new research from Duke Medicine. The study, which appears in the journal BMC Medicine, is the first ... Read More »

Childhood cancer tumours grow quickly, leaving fewer obvious treatment targets
Childhood cancer tumours grow quickly, leaving fewer obvious treatment targets (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

An extensive genomic study of the childhood cancer neuroblastoma reinforces the challenges in treating the most aggressive forms of this disease. Contrary to expectations, the scientists found relatively few recurrent gene mutations—mutations that would suggest new targets for neuroblastoma treatment. ... Read More »

Understanding how influenza impacts critically ill children
Understanding how influenza impacts critically ill children (2 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

Investigators from 15 children’s medical centers, including Nationwide Children’s Hospital, observed and evaluated critically ill children with influenza to evaluate the relationships between levels of systemic inflammation, immune function and likelihood to die from the illness. The innate immune system ... Read More »

 
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