child psychology

Pushing kids into sport too early may backfire
Pushing kids into sport too early may backfire (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)

Pushing kids into sport too early can backfire, with new research showing children who start at age four or five are more likely to drop out of that sport or stop doing sport altogether. Victoria-wide sport participation data funded by ... Read More »

New chapter for youth mental health at University of Technology Sydney
New chapter for youth mental health at University of Technology Sydney (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)

Two deeply personal stories set the tone at the event to launch The Kidman Centre UTS, formerly known as the UTS Health Psychology Unit, founded in 1985 by Professor Antony Kidman. One was a poignant speech by 19-year-old Lucia Hawley, ... Read More »

One in three Australian kids exposed to disadvantage
One in three Australian kids exposed to disadvantage (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)

Almost a third of Australian children experience some form of disadvantage that can have a lasting impact on their development, a new study of more than 5,000 children has found. Changing Children’s Chances identifies patterns in children’s experiences of disadvantage ... Read More »

Caring for the sick and casting out villains: Moral development in children
Caring for the sick and casting out villains: Moral development in children (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

Question: when is a chicken more important than a sick person? Answer: when you’re four years old, according to research from The University of Queensland. A team from the UQ School of Psychology examined moral reasoning in children aged 10 and under. Dr ... Read More »

Disadvantaged kids prescribed antipsychotic medication more often
Disadvantaged kids prescribed antipsychotic medication more often (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)

A new study has shown that Australian children and teens from disadvantaged families are more likely to be prescribed antipsychotic medication than others in the same age group. Social policy researcher Amy Kaim from the Robinson Research Institute at the University of ... Read More »

Toddler bedtime can switch on snooze
Toddler bedtime can switch on snooze (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)

Bedtime fading offers a strong solution to curb toddler bedtime tantrums and promote significant improvements in sleep patterns, research by Flinders University sleep experts has found. Toddler sleep disruption is a significant problem, with studies showing that sleep difficulties affect ... Read More »

Child visits to Victorian emergency departments for mental health issues triple
Child visits to Victorian emergency departments for mental health issues triple (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

New research by the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute (MCRI) has shown over the seven years between 2008 and 2015, mental health presentations have tripled amongst children in the 10-14 and 15-19 age group. The study, published in the Medical Journal of Australia, ... Read More »

AI may help to predict school violence
AI may help to predict school violence (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)

A pilot study indicates that artificial intelligence may be useful in predicting which students are at higher risk of perpetrating school violence. The researchers found that machine learning – the science of getting computers to learn over time without human ... Read More »

Brains of young people with severe behavioural problems are ‘wired differently’
Brains of young people with severe behavioural problems are ‘wired differently’ (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

Research has revealed new clues which might help explain why young people with the most severe forms of antisocial behaviour struggle to control and regulate their emotions, and might be more susceptible to developing anxiety or depression as a result. ... Read More »

Students who are old for their grade more likely to go to uni
Students who are old for their grade more likely to go to uni (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)

An ACU-led study has found that teens who are old for their grade appear to feel more confident about their academic abilities and are more likely to enrol in university than their younger peers. The study of more than 10,000 ... Read More »

 
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