child behaviour

Video games have winning impact in classrooms
Video games have winning impact in classrooms (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)

A Deakin-led research project has found video games such as Minecraft could be useful classroom tools for teaching disengaged students. The discovery was part of the three-year Australian Research Council “Serious Play” project, led by chief investigators from Deakin’s School ... Read More »

Some YouTube found glorifying alcohol
Some YouTube found glorifying alcohol (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

YouTube videos featuring alcohol are heavily viewed and nearly always promote the “fun” side of drinking. That’s the finding of a study in September issue of the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs. Researchers looked at 137 YouTube videos ... Read More »

Youth Advisory Council to encourage kids to be more active
Youth Advisory Council to encourage kids to be more active (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

Researchers from Active Healthy Kids Australia (AHKA) at UniSA are going straight to the source to find out why Australian kids are becoming increasingly inactive. AHKA has established a Youth Advisory Council (YAC) to engage young Australians and give youth ... Read More »

Lower prenatal stress reduces risk of behavioural issues in kids
Lower prenatal stress reduces risk of behavioural issues in kids (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

Parenting is a complicated journey full of questions, and when a beloved child begins to show signs of a behavioural disorder, a parent’s challenges become even more difficult to navigate. Expectant mothers may want to consider adopting today’s trend towards ... Read More »

Physical punishment can be detrimental for children’s behaviour ten years later
Physical punishment can be detrimental for children’s behaviour ten years later (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

Past research has indicated that physical punishment, such as spanking, has negative consequences on child development. However, most research studies have examined short-term associations—less than one year—between discipline and development. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri have found that ... Read More »

Masculine and feminine behaviours influenced socially
Masculine and feminine behaviours influenced socially (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

The different ways men and women behave, passed down from generation to generation, can be inherited from our social environment – not just from genes, experts have suggested. Rather than the sexes acting differently because of genetic inheritance, the human ... Read More »

Children’s theatre adds a dash of life skills
Children’s theatre adds a dash of life skills (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

A new production at Patch Theatre Company is incorporating Flinders University expertise in tips for children to roll with the punches and be the best they can. It’s not easy to fail and take criticism, but learning resilience and how ... Read More »

At what age do kids recognise fairness?
At what age do kids recognise fairness? (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

Children as young as seven have the same capacity as adults to make judgements on the anti-social behaviour of others. A study led by University of Queensland School of Psychology researcher Matti Wilks found that older kids (aged 7–8), but ... Read More »

Children imitate in unique ways
Children imitate in unique ways (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

From an early age, children are very skilled in imitating the actions of others and are so motivated to do so that they will even copy actions for no reason. Imitation is part of what it means to be human, ... Read More »

Older dads have ‘geekier’ sons
Older dads have ‘geekier’ sons (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

New King’s College London research suggests that sons of older fathers are more intelligent, more focused on their interests and less concerned about fitting in, all characteristics typically seen in ‘geeks’. While previous research has shown that children of older ... Read More »

 
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