brain development

Parechovirus epidemic affecting infants needs action: experts
Parechovirus epidemic affecting infants needs action: experts (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)

In the Medical Journal of Australia, experts say there are no effective antiviral therapies, so treatment is primarily supportive, including management of complications. Some infants with severe HPeV infection may have adverse neurodevelopment. Severe disease can manifest as meningoencephalitis, seizures ... Read More »

Brain development influenced by the immune system
Brain development influenced by the immune system (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)

University of Queensland researchers have highlighted a link between foetal brain development and the origins of developmental diseases such as schizophrenia. UQ Faculty of Medicine’s Dr Liam Coulthard said many adult diseases originated during foetal development. “Complement factors – part ... Read More »

Younger aged children with symptoms of ADHD show physical brain differences
Younger aged children with symptoms of ADHD show physical brain differences (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)

Children as young as four years old with symptoms of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) showed reduced brain volumes in regions essential for behavioural control, according to a study published in the Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society. The study, funded by ... Read More »

New perceptual pathway identified that can lead to body size misperception and increase risk of eating and exercise disorders
New perceptual pathway identified that can lead to body size misperception and increase risk of eating and exercise disorders (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)

A new study led by researchers at Macquarie University has identified a psychological pathway that can lead to body size and shape misperception in individuals, putting them at greater risk of developing conditions such as anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and ... Read More »

Children’s screen-time guidelines too restrictive
Children’s screen-time guidelines too restrictive (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

Digital screen use is a staple of contemporary life for adults and children, whether they are browsing on laptops and smartphones, or watching TV. Paediatricians and scientists have long expressed concerns about the impact of overusing technology on people’s wellbeing. ... Read More »

Mum’s immune response could trigger social deficits for kids with autism
Mum’s immune response could trigger social deficits for kids with autism (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)

Children with autism are more likely to show severe social symptoms if their mother had chronic asthma or allergies while pregnant, the University of Sydney’s Brain and Mind Centre revealed in Molecular Psychiatry. The retrospective cohort study of 220 Australian ... Read More »

Unlocking the secrets of autism
Unlocking the secrets of autism (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

The word ‘spectrum’ is used to describe autism because the condition expresses itself in many ways and intensities. A new approach could offer a medical treatment for its most isolating symptoms. From a beckoning index finger or slight tilt of ... Read More »

Your child may be more innovative than you realise
Your child may be more innovative than you realise (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

Children may have a greater understanding of how to innovate and problem solve than previously realised. A study led by University of Queensland School of Psychology researcher Karri Neldner looked at children’s ability to innovate with tools, and the creativity ... Read More »

Differences in brain activity in teens at risk for obesity
Differences in brain activity in teens at risk for obesity (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

In a small study that scanned the brains of teenagers while exposing them to tempting “food cues,” researchers report that reduced activity in the brain’s “self-regulation” system may be an important early predictor of adult obesity. The researchers used functional ... Read More »

Why teens take risks: it’s not a deficit in brain development
Why teens take risks: it’s not a deficit in brain development (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

A popular theory in recent neuroscience proposes that slow development of the prefrontal cortex – and its weak connectivity with brain reward regions – explains teenagers’ seemingly impulsive and risky behaviour. But an extensive literature review to be published in ... Read More »

 
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