After childbirth

‘Connect’ links mums-to-be with student midwives
‘Connect’ links mums-to-be with student midwives (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

An innovative USC program that provides active support for pregnant women on the Sunshine Coast has been expanded following the University’s introduction of a dedicated Bachelor of Midwifery this year. The University is now offering more places in its Connect ... Read More »

Staying connected a key to beating baby blues
Staying connected a key to beating baby blues (3 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

Women who maintain connections with their social groups after having a baby are at lower risk of developing postnatal depression, according to University of Queensland research. UQ School of Psychology researcher Magen Seymour-Smith said women who positively embraced the new role of mother as ... Read More »

Beyond the birth
Beyond the birth (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)

The pain of childbirth isn’t always confined to labour. For some women, medical complications can cause anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder well before, and after, their child’s birth. Lynne Roberts reveals how her own traumatic birthing experience, led her ... Read More »

Letting the ‘love’ hormone kick in after childbirth
Letting the ‘love’ hormone kick in after childbirth (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

The ‘love’ hormone released when mum and baby have quality bonding time immediately after birth reduces the incidence of the woman haemorrhaging, says retired senior obstetrics manager Anne Saxton who will be awarded a Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) at the ... Read More »

Duration of breastfeeding associated with bone density
Duration of breastfeeding associated with bone density (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)

Maternal bone density decreases after childbirth, but only among women who lactate for at least four months. The lactation period is unrelated to vitamin D status. The most important role of vitamin D is to help maintain calcium homeostasis in ... Read More »

Traumatic vaginal births putting women at risk of chronic problems
Traumatic vaginal births putting women at risk of chronic problems (2 votes, average: 4.00 out of 5)

Pregnant women need better information about the risks associated with vaginal births, new research finds. “Mothers do much more damage to themselves when having babies than we were aware of in the past,” says Dr Peter Dietz, Professor of Obstetrics ... Read More »

Saving mothers from deadly haemorrhage
Saving mothers from deadly haemorrhage (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)

While Australia may be one of the safest places on earth to give birth, new research is now focussing on severe postpartum haemorrhage which continues to be a rare and mysterious killer. A collaboration led by University of Technology Sydney ... Read More »

New mums more satisfied after giving birth in a public hospital
New mums more satisfied after giving birth in a public hospital (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)

Women who give birth in a public hospital are more confident parents compared to women who have babies privately, a new Australian study has found. A joint study by Queensland University of Technology and the University of Queensland, surveyed more ... Read More »

GP Q/A: Getting your old body back after childbirth
GP Q/A: Getting your old body back after childbirth (7 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

Reader question Dear Dr Joe, My baby is 2 months old now and I want to get my old body back. I’ve always been a healthy weight, but healthy food, light exercise and breastfeeding alone aren’t working. I don’t want to ... Read More »

Midwife-led birth centers improve outcomes and lower health care costs
Midwife-led birth centers improve outcomes and lower health care costs (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

As health care costs and the rate of cesarean births for expecting mothers have escalated over the past two decades in the United States, a new study released today shows that women who receive care at midwife-led birth centers incur ... Read More »

 
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