parenting

Autistic children’s vision for a better future
Autistic children’s vision for a better future April 26, 2016 (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)

With up to 40% of autistic children suffering from ophthalmic problems (Ikeda et al, 2012), and many unable to tell anyone, Australia’s first dedicated optometry service for children and adults on the autism spectrum is set to dramatically improve the ... Read More »

Mobility plays important role in development for toddlers with disabilities
Mobility plays important role in development for toddlers with disabilities April 22, 2016 (1 votes, average: 3.00 out of 5)

Typical toddlers simultaneously spend about three hours a day in physical activity, play and engagement with objects such as toys, while their peers with mobility disabilities are less likely to engage in all of those behaviours at the same time, ... Read More »

Rewarding children with food could lead to emotional eating
Rewarding children with food could lead to emotional eating April 21, 2016 (1 votes, average: 3.00 out of 5)

Parents who use food as a reward or a treat, could be unintentionally teaching their children to rely on food to deal with their emotions. These children may be more likely to ‘emotionally eat’ later in childhood. These are the ... Read More »

Children of older mothers do better
Children of older mothers do better April 19, 2016 (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)

Most previous research suggests that the older women are when they give birth, the greater the health risks are for their children. Childbearing at older ages is understood to increase the risk of negative pregnancy outcomes such as Down syndrome, ... Read More »

Alarm clock on teen sleep
Alarm clock on teen sleep April 18, 2016 (1 votes, average: 3.00 out of 5)

More than 50% of teenagers do not get enough sleep on school nights, often due to the onset of puberty and social media-internet interaction. While many teens report to be tired next day, parents are loath to intervene with body clock changes ... Read More »

How to avoid bringing up fussy eaters
How to avoid bringing up fussy eaters April 16, 2016 (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

Babies and toddlers who try a wide range of fruit and vegetables around 12 to 14 months of age will be less fussy eaters by the age of 3.7 years and like and eat a greater variety of fruit and ... Read More »

Baby of the family most likely to miss out on breast
Baby of the family most likely to miss out on breast April 11, 2016 (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)

A woman’s education level and the number of children she has affects breast feeding, with the “baby of the family” most likely to miss out, University of Queensland research shows. UQ School of Public Health PhD candidate Natalie Holowko analysed ... Read More »

‘Love’ Hormone and Mother-Infant Bonding
‘Love’ Hormone and Mother-Infant Bonding April 9, 2016 (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)

Widely referred to as the “love” hormone, oxytocin is an indispensable part of childbirth and emotional mother-child bonding. Psychologists at Florida Atlantic University are conducting a novel study to determine how a mother’s levels of oxytocin might be different in ... Read More »

Parents vital to policing young drivers: Have your say
Parents vital to policing young drivers: Have your say April 5, 2016 (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)

A new QUT study will look at what parents in the ACT are doing to keep their kids safe when they first get their licence, with research showing parents play a vital role in encouraging young drivers to obey the ... Read More »

Body image linked to low breastfeeding rates
Body image linked to low breastfeeding rates March 30, 2016 (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)

A survey of more than 250 first-time Queensland mothers has found poor body image may stop many larger women from continuing to breastfeed their newborn babies. University of the Sunshine Coast Lecturer in Biomedical Science Dr Ruth Newby and Professor ... Read More »







 
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