child development

Siblings of children with schizophrenia show resilience to the condition as they grow up
Siblings of children with schizophrenia show resilience to the condition as they grow up August 31, 2015 (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)

Fundamental differences between how the brain forms during adolescence have been discovered in children with schizophrenia and their siblings, a new study shows. The study opens up new avenues for researchers to explore when developing treatment for the illness, which ... Read More »

Needs of low SES regional students
Needs of low SES regional students August 28, 2015 (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)

A study into the learning and wellbeing needs of low socio-economic status students in regional Australia has received a $424,174 funding boost from the Australian Research Council’s 2015 Linkage Project scheme. The project is a collaboration between the University of ... Read More »

Want to boost your toddler’s development? Put a toy chicken on your head!
Want to boost your toddler’s development? Put a toy chicken on your head! August 22, 2015 (1 votes, average: 3.00 out of 5)

Parents who joke and pretend with their children are teaching them important life skills, research by the University of Sheffield has revealed. The study showed that children as young as 16 months old naturally learn the difference between joking and ... Read More »

Real classroom science
Real classroom science August 19, 2015 (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)

Thousands of budding scientists in high school classrooms across Australia could help solve real world problems, while also motivate them to embrace science. Professor David McKinnon, Director of the Edith Cowan Institute for Education Research, has researcher science education for ... Read More »

Spelling Bee not to be taken seriously
Spelling Bee not to be taken seriously August 10, 2015 (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

The Great Australian Spelling Bee does not translate to real world learning and should not be taken seriously by parents or teachers, according to a Charles Sturt University (CSU) spelling expert. Mrs Tessa Daffern is a higher degree researcher at ... Read More »

Poverty’s most insidious damage is to a child’s brain
Poverty’s most insidious damage is to a child’s brain August 9, 2015 (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)

An alarming 22% of U.S. children live in poverty, which can have long-lasting negative consequences on brain development, emotional health and academic achievement. A new study, published July 20 in JAMA Pediatrics, provides even more compelling evidence that growing up ... Read More »

$6.6 million to help positive parenting
$6.6 million to help positive parenting July 30, 2015 (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)

More Queensland families are set to benefit from The University of Queensland’s award-winning Triple P – Positive Parenting Program, after the State Government announced $6.6 million in funding today (9 July). Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk said next week’s State Budget would ... Read More »

Tablet technology to help children with autism
Tablet technology to help children with autism July 27, 2015 (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)

Monash University researchers have developed the world’s first tablet technology designed to assist children with developmental disabilities such as autism and Down Syndrome. The technology aims to help children stay focused, in a bid to facilitate learning and inclusion within ... Read More »

Australia left for dust on early childhood education
Australia left for dust on early childhood education July 18, 2015 (2 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

A new McKell Institute report shows Australia is being left behind by other developed nations that treat childcare as a vital early childhood education opportunity for all, and not simply ‘babysitting’ for mothers returning to the workforce. The report, Baby ... Read More »

Families’ communication choices for children with hearing loss
Families’ communication choices for children with hearing loss July 12, 2015 (0 votes, average: 0.00 out of 5)

Parents of young children who experience hearing loss are influenced by a number of external factors when deciding whether their child will use speech or sign language, or be multilingual, research from Charles Sturt University (CSU) has shown. Professor Sharynne ... Read More »







 
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